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Page Wagner Associates Ltd.

Design  |  Planning  |  Environmental Management  |  Education

Landscape Architect

habitat creation, biodiversity & management

Penny was brought up from an early age to recognise the native wild flora of our lovely land, and this heritage of knowledge passed on by her mother, has been instrumental in her love of establishing and encouraging a diverse range of habitats on all the sites she works on. Habitat creation and management are intrinsically linked and Penny is experienced in both writing management documentation and guiding landscape managers in their role of establishing and managing the developing flora and fauna. At The Springs, a diverse range of habitats have been developed including marginal and deep water wetland, a range of grassland habitats based on a varying pattern of mowing regimes, scrub, hazel coppice, native woodland, gorse, meadow flora, heritage orchard, modern fruit and ornamental shrubbery for a start! Penny has recently worked with the client to develop winter fodder crops for over-wintering birds to extend the season for the migrant bird population.  As a result the diversity of the wildlife which lives in close proximity to the caravan users is extensive, and this has been recognised by David Bellamy’s Gold Award and highest recognition of merit.


In London, the design for the Blackwall Tunnel had as part of the design remit to promote biodiversity. A range of both native and more ornamental tree species were linked with Cornus, grasses, yarrows, tulips for an increased sources of nectar for the insects and butterflies in this harsh locality.


Gardens can be one of the richest sources of biodiversity for wildlife and Penny’s designs reflect both an extensive plant knowledge but importantly how these can benefit the flora and fauna. Nectar sources do not need to be from just native plants, and the wealth and array of plant material available can extend the role of our native plant stock.